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that there is going to be a positive conclusion in washington. the downside is not if there is not a vote to settle it. >> thank you, guys. see you later. have a good weekend. that's the first hour of the "closing bell" with the dow down 40 point. here's the second hour now with bartiromo. >>> hi, everybody. good afternoon. welcome to the "closing bell." i'm maria bartiromo. this market closing lower on this day of national tragedy. we'll have the late on the senseless school shooting in connecticut in just a moment for you, but, first, take a look at how we're finishing the day on wall street. declines on the market. once again worries about the fiscal cliff going into year end. the dow jones industrial average down about 33 points on the session at 13,137. volume really stopped in the middle of the day. we saw things slow down quite a bit on the heels of the awful shooting and fatalities in connecticut. the nasdaq and s&p 500 also under pressure today. the mood down here impacted by the awful events in connecticut with us is hank smith of haverford investments and maggie patel and rajai from barclay
closing bell." the market down today. washington is not even close to reaching a deal to avoid the fiscal cliff. we had a triple digit decline today. here is how we're finishing the day on wall street. at the lows, dow was down 189 points. by the close, we came a fair amount of the way back from that sharp decline in the morning hours. volume very heavy today. that's how he saw a lot of shifting in the volume for the day. 1.2 billion shares here. nasdaq gave up that 29 points at the close and the s&p 500 down 13.25 points. five trading days left until the fiscal cliff deadline. seven days until congress is back in washington. raymond james says he's expecting the santa claus rally. jeff is with me now also dean from barclay's, peter anderson and our own rick santelli. jeff, how can this market rally when there's still so much uncertainty out there? >> i am surprised the market held up as well as it did today, maria. it had every reason to be down four or 500 points. historically, the week after christmas it's up about 70% of the time with a little over a percent gain. and i think you're g
of drama in washington. congressional leaders have arrived at white house. they arrived there about an hour ago with three days to go before we go over that proverbial fiscal cliff. they are meeting with the president and the treasury secretary timothy geithner, and they are trying to hash out a deal. but reports that the president has nothing new on the table has ended up spooking wall street in a big way just in the last hour, and as bill said we finished down near the lows of the day, down about 157 points for the dow. settling up right now. down what, about 165 at the very low, bill? >> i think so, yes. >> and the nasdaq finishing down 25 points and the s&p off by 15, a fifth straight day in the red. well, it is the last friday of 2012. it's in the books. check. still no deal in sight and no new offer either on the table from the president as eamon javers told us a little while ago. what now for the markets? we have our guests and our very own rick sell sebak with us. rick, let me get to you, first of all, because you're here on the set. what now for the markets? >> what now for the mar
into this market. investors still hoping for a deal in washington to avoid the fiscal cliff. take a look at how we're settling on wall street. as we saw money moving into equities in the last 20 minutes pushing the dow jones industrial average up to 60 points higher at the close at 13,312 on the dow jones industrial average. nasdaq also finishing in the plus column with a gain of six points, and the s&p 500 up about eight points, one-half of 1% at 1433. closing in on the fiscal cliff deadline still with no deal in sight, let's find out how you should be investing in the face of the fiscal cliff fiasco. we want to dig deeper into the nyc/i.c.e. deal as well announced today, that it means for you and the global exchanges. gentlemen, welcome. thanks soechg for joining us. >> thanks. >> thanks for having me. >> let me kick this off with you in terms of the fiscal cliff. give me your strategy, deal or no deal? >> i think there will be a deal. this plan "b" that wehner has actually -- waiting to see if it actually makes it to the congress for a vote is actually a big deal because if he gets it through c
said he was come back to washington and jumping on an airplane to review some new proposal from the president that they expected to get. the whole afternoon has been spent by reporters trying -- trying to figure out what was going on. now harry vaed responding to mcconnell so let's right to it. >> he's upset because, quote, the phone never rang. he complains i've not delivered solutions to the fiscal cliff. he's in error. we all know that in july of this year we passed in the senate the relief that would give -- that it would give to middle class americans. that -- that passed the senate. now, we know the republicans have buried themselves in procedural roadblocks in everything we're trying to do out here and now they are saying, well, we can't do the 250 because it wasn't blue slipped, because it will be blue slipped. mr. president, how does the american people retook the that? there was a bill introduced by the ranking member of the ways and means committee in the house, sandy levin, that called for this legislation. the speaker was going to bring it up to kill it, but he coul
of washington and our very own john harwood is there. >> reporter: mandy, we've got a letter from the republican leadership to the president and to the democrats in the senate saying that the house has acted, they passed legislation last year to extend all the tax cuts and to shift the scheduled sequester cuts from defense to domestic programs, but, of course, in urging the senate to act saying, well, we've acted, now it's your turn, we're simply not going to see the democrats take them up on that because president obama since that letter has won the election and now we're looking at the possibility of a mini deal that would get enacted before january 1st but so far all we've heard are the sounds of silence in the negotiations. a senior white house official told me today when i asked was there any holiday season progress, back channel progress over the past couple of days, got a one-word reply, no. second, the democratic senate leadership says there's a 50/50 chance that we'd get a deal between now and january 1st, but they don't have any progress signs to point to in a tangible way. that's sort
to the "closing bell." some very important headlines coming out of washington as we speak. you just heard, by the way, the very last closing bell of 2012. coming up in the next hour, we're going to break it down for you. help you use that knowledge to navigate well in 2013. >>> here are the near-final figure y figures. one trader said to me we were lower friday because nobody wanted to go into the weekend long the market. now nobody wants to go short the market tonight in case they're able to get this deal done and vote on it in the next couple days. the dow at 13,106.98 to close out. the s&p up today. and a strong day for the nasdaq. up 2% right now at 3,019. >> certainly the market didn't seem to be particularly deterred by the news that john harwood just broke there, the fact it looks like no vote in the house tonight. which would mean technically we'd go over the cliff. but he still thinks a deal will be struck but just not tonight. 2012, check. it's in the books at least for the markets, that is. and while the clock keeps on ticking, no deal yet. what is an investor to do in the new
millionaires. another reason why the folks in washington should keep on talking. >> really interesting stuff. so, while we have you, robert, let's talk about what we learned on oracle, announcing plans to pay out second quarter, third quarter and fourth quarter dividends this month. what is ceo larry ellison's cut on this? is it $199 million as reported a minute ago? >> it sounds like it's around $200 million. you had that great interview with him where he's talking about his dream of buying the lakers. this might help him do that. $200 million. his tax savings alone on this, if dividends are now at 15% and they go up to over 43%, his tax savings alone, just by doing it this year, over $60 million just on the tax savings. this does make sense for those really big shareholders like larry ellison. >> you know, he's the ceo of the company. so, you know, we could look at him and say, okay, well, he's saving all this money but the savings ripple through, right? >> absolutely. >> if you're a shareholder you're saving a huge amount of money, particularly if the dividend goes to 44%. >> absolutely.
washington with maria bartiromo on the "closing bell." >> it's 4:00 on wall street. do you know where your money is? hi, everybody. welcome back to "closing bell." i'm maria bartiromo coming to you live from the white house. stocks rallying and closing off the best levels of the session after senate majority leader harry reid warned it will be tough to reach a deal to avoid the fiscal cliff before christmas. we all note deadline, december 31. take a look at how we're finishing the day. the dow jones industrial average up about 80 points today. it was higher, much higher than 100 points earlier today, up two-thirds of 1%. volume on the light side this afternoon. nasdaq composite picked it up. technology up better than 1%. s&p 500 also on the upswing. markets maintaining steady gains all day long. david kudlow and bob pisani and barbara from the street. welcome to all of you. what about coming off the best levels? >> hitting search-week highs. 13,245 is where we ended the night of election and waiting for it to settle out. 13,248, so we are exactly where we were when the elections closed. i
of washington. joining us right now, keith springer, abbigail doolittle, and our own bob posani. keith, let me get your take on the cliff here and on what's to happen in terms of the markets. do you expect the economy to go over the fiscal cliff? what kind of reaction might we see in the market if that were to materialize? >> well, if we saw the market sell off in a big way, i don't think anybody believes we're going to go over the fiscal cliff. there will be some sort of resolution. they'll come up with some tax cuts, some breaks in spending, and probably kick the can down the road on a lot of it. i love the way this market is acting. it's not selling off with all the bad news, all the bickering, all the bad words on each side. you've got to love the way that this market is holding up here. doesn't mean investors need to be carefree, but overall, it looks like the market is setting up with a lot of negative sentiment out there. looks like there's a lot of opportunity for a big run higher once we get some form of resolution. i really believe we're going to get it. >> you think by year end? >>
of 98 points at 13,252. once again we saw both sides digging n.no deal on the fiscal cliff in washington and stocks sold out. nasdaq composite off a third of a percent and the s&p 500 down 11 points, and the countdown continues. only seven trading days left until the fiscal cliff dead livent was today the beginning of a bigger selloff if a deal does not come soon? joining me right now is a cnbc contributor from western destination and steven hammers from the emp fund and our own rick santelli and joe greco from meridian equity partners finishing up his trades and will join us momentarily. good to see everybody. michael, let me kick it off with you. i know it's really hard to navigate every day because every day there's a new expectation in the market, but it felt like today was about the fiscal cliff. if we go over the fiscal cliff with no deal, is that a significant issue for the markets early january? >> if we go over the fiscal cliff without a deal, we're probably looking at a 6%, 7% correction and then in my view you load up on equities. you know, maria, we're starting to put a littl
's going on in washington. i'm not sure who those republicans are. i'm not so sure on whether the fiscal conservatives in the party know something about some big reforms on medicare and medica medicare, social security is, any of the retirement or tax issues, but i'll tell you this. i think that all these stories aren't necessarily going lead us to the truth. i personally have a very size way i'm approaching this. the president is supposed to leave for a 21-day vacation in hawaii on december 17th. where he is on december 18th will tell me, and i think the markets will pay attention. i find it hard to believe, and i agree with bill and many, who are very not amused by the house taking their long weekend. i'm sure that the president would have no intentions of leaving until these issues are resolved. i think the market is being kind, but i think it's a timing issue. >> yeah, i think that's a good point. somebody mentioned the other day that the president is planning a trip to hawaii on december 17th. i said, what? they said, no, no, no, not unless the deal is done. we'll see about that. me
up. i'm concerned that we're debasing our currency to a certain extent. washington has yet to revoke the laws of supply and demand, and we certainly have supplied the economy with a massive amount of liquidity with the same goods and services, the balance has to be priced, and a price situation is going to be higher levels of inflation and they are keeping rates down pretty much right now. >> yeah. >> we have a diminishing level of return, and that's what's happening. we're pushing rates down, but it's not having the impact. >> lower bang for your qe buck as steve liesman put it earlier on. >> thanks for joining us. always good to see you, eyore pento. >> putting fire into the conversation. >> thank you. >>> so much for the holiday cheer. with the rate things are going in washington, there will be plenty of holiday jeer between now and the new year. >> the president's called for $1.4 trillion worth of revenue. that cannot pass the house or the senate. >>> well, two former presidential candidates face off after the break. i feel like i'm going back to 2008 or 2004. steve forbes says n
you don't know the playing rules especially when there's so much disorganization in washington, there's no reason for the client to get involved. but when you add other taxes now, not just cap gains taxes and so on, now you're talking about high income cities like new york. you're talking about 53% plus another 3.8% with the obama care medicare surtax. >> so 53 -- 57% of the wealthiest out there -- 57% of their income is going to the government. then ron, you also agree even with that the habits are unlikely to change. >> well, that all depends. someone making a million dollars, $100,000 from dividend, 85 from capital gains. under the 250 rule, they're seeing their taxes go up $70,000 or so. under the million dollar proposal by boehner, that's a $30,000 increase. $30,000 is not that much. but it is after tax money. 70,000 is another number. i think it will affect them somewhat. i'm more worried about their future of what they'll not be saving. even the wealthy have to worry about the future. >> so how does it impact spending and give us the ripple effects of these higher tax rates and
it certainly sends a message that politicians in washington are as dysfunctional as they appear to be, so i think politics as a macro driver i think stays very much in -- in the picture under those circumstances, and i think it does put a damper on psychology, investor psychology, business psychology, so it absolutely does come into play. we're certainly not telling our investors in the very near team ie between now and year end to trade around a possible outcome. i think that is a relatively dangerous thing to do. >> and alan, do you agree there? what do you want to be exposed to going into the new year from your standpoint? >> well, i would say that, first of all, i'm neutral on equities in my ridgeworth allocation strategy funds and it's because of the fiscal cliff. if you look at the underlying fundamentals, the housing market is getting better. europe appears to be moving in the right direction as is china so the fundamentals are moving in the right direction, but the truth is if washington messes this up, we could go into recession the first part of next year, so that's what's keeping
washington needs to resolve this fiscal cliff issue if they don't want consumers to stop their spending ways. >> let me start with what's going on in washington. we've got this negotiation for the fiscal cliff. if we go over the fiscal cliff, what is the impact to your business? >> well, there would be an impact on consumption, for sure. so when it comes to puma or mainstream brands in america in sports, there will be a for sure some consequences in terms of consumption. but i see that as an investment for the future. so it might be a little bit different from some of other ceos. we have to get over the fiscal cliff. let's not delay the thing. it needs efforts. let's make them short for a better future. i think we should be ready as a corporation, being ready for maybe a year of difficult market, difficult situation in the market because that is a ceiling on our growth in terms of economical growth as to be released. it's really me an investment for the future. >> you're seeing a similar situation in france where we're talking about the possibility of capital gains taxes and dividend taxes g
'll compromise. one way or another, washington will compromise. >> you talking fundamentals here. >> we have to find out what the reason is it's going up. it has to be that. >> dan, are you ecstatic or more sober on what's happening? >> i'm a little more cautious. i totally agree with ralph that the market action today is terrific this year on bad news. i think the next six months are going to be very tricky. i think the fiscal cliff uncertainty is going to continue t actually. so i'm a little more bearish in the near term. then i think it's a sell-off, if there is one, that should be bought aggressively for a rally in the end of 2013 that would be the beginning of a new bull market. >> when you say a rally towards the end of next year, do you think over the course of 2013 it's going to end higher? we're going to be higher than where we are right now? >> yeah, i mean, i think ultimately 2013 ends up higher at the end. i think we're going to go -- we're going to test some lower resistance in the first six, seven months of the year. we have so much uncertainty in washington. we do have slowing
of washington so give me your long-term expectations as well. >> i think the economy is doing quite well, you know, despite the fiscal cliff, and even thought the worries about taxes are affecting investors, they are not really affecting general economic activity, so the good news is the economy's got some sort of head of steam going, so from that perspective if they can do a deal relatively quickly, thin think we're in good shape. >> come on, if you look at the of a dense measures, they are turning down and measures of durable good orders, turning down. our question is housing and recoveries and they account for almost 80% of the economy. you're right, the capital goods orders are hurting, mostly because businesses are uncertain, i agree but general consumer spending, confidence aside. consumers are spending. that's the good news. >> the good news is they are not focused on the fiscal cliff the way businesses are, but at some point everything comes home to roost. sentiment is up, spending is up, but are we spending our way into oblivion and then we're going to find out oops? >> i doubt it. >
nanigans goi in washington. there are 535 people who have to think i want to keep my job. they'll decide to rise above. this is all going to be wonderful. in the meantime, if you're trying to figure out which way to go, i have traders out here who will tell you every day very difficult thing to do. >> isn't that the case. for sure. >> sandy, weigh in here. what would you be doing? >> actually i take a little bit different view. this fiscal cliff is a grander issue than just the united states. the drag in the u.s. is a big import to the rest of the world. stock markets are supposed to be leading economic indicators. if you look at the markets around the world from the last several weeks to months, the markets seem to be indicating just the opposite. they seem to be indicating that a deal will get done. what kind of deal whether it's one stage or two stage, nobody knows. but the fact of the matter is the equity markets tend to look three to six months out. they're giving good signs around the world. in europe, asia, emerging markets and here in the u.s. what i'd be doing is sitting on a we
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19